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Flowers are fabulous! Just like you, we are so happy to be able to work with them every day. At this blog we offer you floral design inspiration and extensive product information, and we hope to boost your creativity.

Watch video tutorials, read articles, discover mood boards, and much more to get inspired! Learn all about the flowers, greens, and branches you love at our #flowerwiki section: lots of product information and care tips.

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Design Inspiration

Video Tutorial: Fall Wreath

Be inspired by this video tutorial and learn how to create a fall wreath with orange slices, Eucalyptus, and Amaranthus. Follow the steps below and create a beautiful fall wreath!…

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Orange Flowers | Holex Flower
Color

Orange

The name orange is originative from the Persian Narang (the Spanish Naranja), what means orange (like the fruit). In English, French, and Spanish we use the same name for the…

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Monstera Flowerwiki Holex Flower Blog
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Monstera Leaf

This plant occurs naturally in the tropical forests of southern Mexico to Panama. It is a climbing plant with meaty air roots that can grow up to 20 meters. The plant belongs to the Araceae family, the same family to which the Calla belongs.

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calla zantedeschia flowerwiki holex flower blog
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Calla Lily

Rarely a flower is known by so many different names. Besides Calla Lily, we also know the flower under the names Calla, Zantedeschia, Arum Aethiopicum, and Arum Lily. The latter name refers to the origin of the flower and the shape (calyx) of the flower. The name Zantedeschia comes from the Italian botanist G. Zantedeschi (1773 – 1846). It’s discoverer, Kurt Sprengel (1766–1833), called it like this as a tribute. Calla refers to the Greek word for beautiful, and also Aethiopicum has a Greek origin and means ‘sunbathed.’

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lily pink dutch holland flowerwiki holex flower blog
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Lily

Like more flowers, also the name of the Lily comes from a Greek legend. While feeding her baby Hercules, the goddess Era spilled milk on the ground. There on that spot, was growing a Lily.

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hydrangea hortensia dutch flowerwiki holex flower blog
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Hydrangea

One of the most famous flowers is the Hydrangea. Its name comes from the shape of the flower, which looks (with a little imagination) like an old pitcher. Botanist Grovonius discovered the plant in 1771. He combined the names Hydro (which means water) and Angeion (which means pitcher), and the name Hydrangea was born. Another story about the origin of the name is the story that the flower is named after a famous woman: Queen Hortense (daughter of Napoleon and Josephine de Beauharnais).

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pincushion leucospermum flowerwiki holex flower blog
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Pincushion

Once this flower only grew in South Africa on the rocky coast of Cape Point (Cape of Good Hope). Nowadays, fortunately, many more people can enjoy this beautiful bloom. The flower belongs to the Leucospermum family, a family with more than 50 species.

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Tulip

Perhaps the best-known export product of The Netherlands is the Tulip. Nevertheless, this flower (and bulb) comes originally not from the Netherlands but, surprisingly, from Turkey (the Ottoman Empire). The Latin name for Tulip is Tulipa, which means translated “the flower that looks like a turban”. In the 16th century, the tulip became a popular flower at the Turkish empire of Suleyman the Great. At that time the men used to wear a turban in Turkey.

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echeveria dutch succulent flowerwiki holex flower blog
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Echeveria

Echeveria is named after the 18th-century Mexican painter and draftsman Anastasio Echeverria. The Spanish king then sent a explorers team to Mexico to map the flora. New plants were painted and signed by Anastasio Echeverria.

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Cymbidium colors
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Cymbidium

The Orchid family counts more than forty varieties; they are all family of the Cymbidium. Many Orchids need the tropical heat to grow, but not Cymbidium. Originally this flower comes from the Himalayas, where the flower grew at high altitude. On this rocky soil and with cold temperatures the plant is doing well. Due to these circumstances, the plant has developed strong cut flowers with a long vase life.

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