#flowerwiki

Always wanted to know more about a specific type of flower? We hope our #flowerwiki section can help to enrich your knowledge!

Click on your favorite flower below to read more.

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#flowerwiki

Amaryllis

Amaryllis, also known as Hippeastrum, originally comes from Central America and the Caribbean. The name Amaryllis comes from the Greek word ‘amarussein’, what means sparkling. This beautiful flower is part of the Daffodil family, and like the whole family, it grows from a flower bulb.

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Pinus

The Pinus belongs to the Pinaceae family, which is also known under the name ‘pine family’. Everybody knows these trees, and therefore the Pinus is indispensable for the winter season! The Pine has a broad distribution in the northern hemisphere: primarily in North America and Asia, many species occur.

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Chamaecyparis
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Chamaecyparis

Chamaecyparis belongs to the species Conifer and is part of the Cypress family Cupressaceae. This type of tree is native to eastern Asia, in specific Japan and Taiwan, and some Northern states of the United States. Chamaecyparis are dwarf growing Cypress trees.

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Hypericum

Hypericum is native to the Mediterranean region of Europe, northern Africa, and the Middle East. There are hundreds of Hypericum varieties, in many different colors. The flower is also widely known as St. John Wort. This species, Hypericum Perforatum, is known for the beneficial effects and is being processed in various pharmaceutical products.

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Hyacinth Flowerwiki Holex Flower Blog
#flowerwiki

Hyacinth

The origin of the Hyacinth is in the East, around the Mediterranean, between Lebanon and Turkey. The cultivation shifted slowly to France and from France to The Netherlands in the bulb region. This region, with dune ground, proved to be extremely suitable for the cultivation of this flower (bulb). Under these excellent conditions, the production seriously started, and the rest is history. Nowadays there are over 2000 varieties.

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