#flowerwiki

Always wanted to know more about a specific type of flower, green or branch? Our #flowerwiki blog section helps you to enrich your knowledge!
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flowerwiki

Fascinating Product Stories

We learn you all about the origin of products and their symbolism, which is often accompanied by beautiful stories. Stories you can tell your customers when they ask you for advice on how to fill a specific order, like a bridal bouquet, holiday centerpiece, or funeral tribute!

Did you know that the name “Amaryllis” comes from the Greek word amarussein, what means sparkling? What a beautiful name for a flower! Because it truly adds that extra little bit of sparkle to every floral Christmas design! And did you know there are more than 2000 Hyacinth varieties, which are almost all are grown in the Netherlands? Our little country proved to be extremely suitable for the cultivation of these gorgeous flowers, because of the dune ground!

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Floral Design Suggestions

Next, to the theoretical enrichment, we also offer you practical input: which products match magnificently with each other? Gloriosa combines perfectly with Gerbera and Craspedia. Think of the gorgeous Ranunculus flowers, in combination with other romantic flowers like Tulip and Muscari. Lovely! Visit our floral design inspiration section for more design suggestions.

Care Tips

Now you have ordered all those stunning flowers, you must be sure that you treat them the right way, so rot and other trouble can be prevented. But how much water do you need to put into the bucket? This can differ per product!

Visit the product pages to see what applies to every product.

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All #flowerwiki Posts

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Hydrangea

One of the most famous flowers is the Hydrangea. Its name comes from the shape of the flower, which looks (with a little imagination) like an old pitcher. Botanist Grovonius discovered the plant in 1771. He combined the names Hydro (which means water) and Angeion (which means pitcher), and the name Hydrangea was born. Another story about the origin of the name is the story that the flower is named after a famous woman: Queen Hortense (daughter of Napoleon and Josephine de Beauharnais).

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Pincushion

Once this flower only grew in South Africa on the rocky coast of Cape Point (Cape of Good Hope). Nowadays, fortunately, many more people can enjoy this beautiful bloom. The flower belongs to the Leucospermum family, a family with more than 50 species.

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Tulip

Perhaps the best-known export product of The Netherlands is the Tulip. Nevertheless, this flower (and bulb) comes originally not from the Netherlands but, surprisingly, from Turkey (the Ottoman Empire). The Latin name for Tulip is Tulipa, which means translated “the flower that looks like a turban”. In the 16th century, the tulip became a popular flower at the Turkish empire of Suleyman the Great. At that time the men used to wear a turban in Turkey.

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Ilex

Ilex is a species of 400 flowering plants out of the holy family (Aquifoliaceae). The plant is originally from the eastern part of North America and the southeast in Canada. Native Americans used the berries for medical purpose. That’s the reason the plant got the nickname fever bush. One of the other names of this plant is winterberry. The plant loses all his leaves in the winter, the only thing what remains are the typical berries. But be careful! Those berries are mildly toxic to humans.

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Echeveria

Echeveria is named after the 18th-century Mexican painter and draftsman Anastasio Echeverria. The Spanish king then sent a explorers team to Mexico to map the flora. New plants were painted and signed by Anastasio Echeverria.

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Ranunculus

Ranunculus comes from a large family called Ranunculaceae, a family with many famous flowers.  Aconitum, Delphinium, and Peony also belong to this family. Ranunculus is originally from Central Asia. How the flower finally found her way to Europe is not clear. Probably the flower looked so good that sailors took the flower back home.

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Lisianthus

The root of Lisianthus can be found in the southern states of the USA. The flower occurred in the prairies of Colorado, Texas, Nebraska, and Nevada. There the flower grew in river beds as a pure prairie plant. However, the rise of Lisianthus as a cut flower started in Japan. In the 1930s Japanese growers started breeding, and even today our assortment consists of varieties with a Japanese origin. For that reason, the flower is also known as the Japanese rose.

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Cymbidium colors
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Cymbidium

The Orchid family counts more than forty varieties; they are all family of the Cymbidium. Many Orchids need the tropical heat to grow, but not Cymbidium. Originally this flower comes from the Himalayas, where the flower grew at high altitude. On this rocky soil and with cold temperatures the plant is doing well. Due to these circumstances, the plant has developed strong cut flowers with a long vase life.

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Peony

The history of this flower starts in China. The flowers have been cultivated there because of their roots and flowers. The Chinese ate the roots because it would cure you of fever. Since 1784 Peonies have been found in Europe.

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Gloriosa

This beautiful climber comes originally from the African and Asian parts of the tropics. These are areas where there is little or no rainfall at specific periods of the year. During the dry time, the upper part of the plant dies, and when the soil becomes moist again, the plant is coming alive.

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Gerbera

The discovery of the Gerbera has a Dutch touch, even though it was in South Africa. In 1727, the plant was discovered in Africa by Mr. Gronovius, a botanist from Leiden, who called the plant after his colleague Traugott Gerber. In 1827 the flower was introduced to the United Kingdom, and there the production was further refined and cultivated. Since 1950, the Netherlands is the largest country in the field of Gerbera development. Since 1975 it has become a very popular cut flower, and many Gerberas are exported. Gerbera belongs to the genus Asteraceae and is a non-fragrant flower.

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